top of page

Questions and Answers

Public·43 members
Landon Rogers
Landon Rogers

How Shakespeare Used Classical Sources and References in His Essays



Introduction




An essay is a short piece of writing that expresses a personal opinion or argument on a specific topic or issue. Essays can be formal or informal, academic or creative, factual or fictional. They can be written for various purposes, such as to inform, persuade, entertain or educate. Essays can also be classified into different types, such as narrative, descriptive, expository or argumentative.




famous essay of shakespeare


Download File: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Ftweeat.com%2F2udegV&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw1OUl6ntCa-wQ1cpR9trZCs



William Shakespeare (1564-1616) is widely regarded as the greatest writer in the history of English literature. He wrote 37 plays, 154 sonnets and two long narrative poems. He also wrote several essays that are less known but equally important and impressive. Shakespeare's essays are not typical examples of this genre. They are not structured as logical arguments with clear introductions, body paragraphs and conclusions. They are not based on factual evidence or research. They are not meant to be read as academic papers or scholarly articles.


Shakespeare's essays are more like poetic meditations on various themes and topics that interest him. They are written in verse, using rhyme, rhythm, meter and figurative language. They are rich in imagery, symbolism, allegory and allusion. They are influenced by classical mythology, history, philosophy and literature. They are also connected to his plays and poems, sharing some of their characters, plots, settings and motifs.


Shakespeare's essays explore some of the most universal and timeless questions that human beings face: What is love? What is death? What is justice? What is honour? What is virtue? What is beauty? What is truth? How do we cope with suffering? How do we deal with guilt? How do we find meaning in life?


To read and appreciate Shakespeare's essays, one needs to have some background knowledge about his life, times and works. One also needs to have some familiarity with his language, style and techniques. One also needs to have an open mind, a curious spirit and a critical eye. One also needs to have a sense of wonder, a sense of humour and a sense of awe.


The Essays of Shakespeare




Shakespeare wrote four major essays that are usually included in his complete works. They are: The Phoenix and the Turtle, A Lover's Complaint, The Rape of Lucrece and The Passionate Pilgrim. The first three are considered to be his most original and mature essays, while the last one is a collection of poems that may not be entirely his own. In this article, we will focus on the first three essays and examine their historical and literary contexts, their plots and characters, their themes and messages, and their relevance and significance for modern readers.


Shakespeare's essays are different from his plays and poems in several ways. First, they are shorter and more concise, ranging from 67 lines to 1855 lines. Second, they are more focused and coherent, dealing with one main topic or issue. Third, they are more personal and intimate, revealing more of his thoughts and feelings. Fourth, they are more experimental and innovative, using various forms and genres.


Shakespeare's style, language, rhetoric and imagery in his essays are similar to those in his plays and poems. He uses a variety of poetic devices, such as metaphor, simile, personification, hyperbole, irony, paradox, antithesis, oxymoron, pun, alliteration, assonance, consonance, rhyme, rhythm and meter. He also uses a range of literary references, such as classical mythology, history, philosophy and literature. He also uses a range of rhetorical strategies, such as repetition, contrast, comparison, analogy, exemplification, illustration and quotation.


Shakespeare's influence and legacy on later writers and thinkers are immense and undeniable. His essays have inspired many poets, novelists, essayists, philosophers, critics and scholars to emulate his style, to borrow his ideas, to respond to his arguments or to challenge his views. His essays have also been translated into many languages and adapted into many media forms. His essays have also been studied and taught in many schools and universities around the world.


Essay 1: The Phoenix and the Turtle




The Phoenix and the Turtle is a short allegorical poem that was first published in 1601 as part of a collection called Love's Martyr. The poem is dedicated to "the most excellent and learned young gentleman Mr. W.H.", who may be the same person as the mysterious "fair youth" addressed in Shakespeare's sonnets.


The poem tells the story of two birds: the phoenix and the turtle dove. The phoenix is a mythical creature that lives for 500 years and then burns itself to ashes before being reborn from its own ashes. The turtle dove is a symbol of faithful love and loyalty. The poem describes how these two birds form an inseparable bond of love that transcends death.


The poem consists of four parts: an introduction by an unnamed narrator; a threnody (a song of mourning) by various birds; an epitaph (a commemorative inscription) by the eagle; and an envoy (a concluding remark) by the narrator. The poem uses a complex rhyme scheme (ABABBCCDDC) and a regular meter (iambic pentameter).


The poem can be interpreted in different ways: as an allegory of ideal love; as an allegory of spiritual union; as an allegory of artistic creation; as an allegory of political resistance; or as an allegory of personal experience. The poem can also be seen as a reflection on the nature and meaning of life, death and immortality.


The poem is relevant and significant for modern readers because it challenges us to think about the power and beauty of love; the mystery and mystery of death; the possibility and impossibility of transcendence; the value and purpose of art; the role and responsibility of society; and the identity and destiny of ourselves.


Essay 2: A Lover's Complaint




A Lover's Complaint is a long narrative poem that was first published in 1609 as part of the first edition of Shakespeare's sonnets. The poem is written in the form of a dialogue between a young woman who has been betrayed by her lover and an old man who listens to her story.


The poem tells the story of how the young woman fell in love with a handsome but deceitful man who wooed her with sweet words and promises but then abandoned her after seducing her. The poem describes how the young woman suffers from grief, shame, anger and despair. The poem also reveals how the old man tries to comfort her with sympathy, advice and hope.


Essay 3: The Rape of Lucrece




The Rape of Lucrece is a long narrative poem that was first published in 1594 as a separate volume. The poem is dedicated to Henry Wriothesley, the Earl of Southampton, who was also the patron of Shakespeare's sonnets. The poem is based on a historical event that took place in ancient Rome in 509 BC.


The poem tells the story of how Lucrece, the virtuous wife of Collatine, a Roman nobleman and soldier, was raped by Tarquin, the son of the tyrannical king of Rome. The poem describes how Lucrece resisted Tarquin's advances and how Tarquin threatened her with dishonor and death. The poem also depicts how Lucrece suffered from shame and grief after the rape and how she revealed her ordeal to her husband and his friends. The poem also narrates how Lucrece killed herself to preserve her honor and how her death sparked a rebellion that overthrew the monarchy and established the Roman Republic.


The poem consists of 1855 lines, divided into 265 stanzas of seven lines each. The poem uses a rhyme scheme (ABABBCC) known as rhyme royal or Chaucerian stanza. The poem also uses a regular meter (iambic pentameter).


The poem can be interpreted in different ways: as a political allegory of the struggle between tyranny and liberty; as a moral allegory of the conflict between vice and virtue; as a psychological allegory of the trauma and guilt of sexual violence; as a social allegory of the oppression and resistance of women; or as a personal allegory of Shakespeare's own experiences and emotions.


The poem is relevant and significant for modern readers because it challenges us to think about the causes and consequences of rape; the rights and duties of women; the ethics and politics of suicide; the origins and values of democracy; the role and responsibility of art; and the identity and destiny of ourselves.


Conclusion




In this article, we have discussed three of Shakespeare's famous essays: The Phoenix and the Turtle, A Lover's Complaint and The Rape of Lucrece. We have examined their historical and literary contexts, their plots and characters, their themes and messages, and their relevance and significance for modern readers. We have also compared them with his plays and poems and analyzed his style, language, rhetoric and imagery.


We have shown that Shakespeare's essays are not typical examples of this genre. They are more like poetic meditations on various themes and topics that interest him. They are written in verse, using rhyme, rhythm, meter and figurative language. They are rich in imagery, symbolism, allegory and allusion. They are influenced by classical mythology, history, philosophy and literature. They are also connected to his plays and poems, sharing some of their characters, plots, settings and motifs.


We have also shown that Shakespeare's essays explore some of the most universal and timeless questions that human beings face: What is love? What is death? What is justice? What is honour? What is virtue? What is beauty? What is truth? How do we cope with suffering? How do we deal with guilt? How do we find meaning in life?


We have also shown that Shakespeare's essays are relevant and significant for modern readers because they challenge us to think about the power and beauty of love; the mystery and mystery of death; the possibility and impossibility of transcendence; the value and purpose of art; the role and responsibility of society; and the identity and destiny of ourselves.


If you want to learn more about Shakespeare's essays, you can read them online or in print editions. You can also watch or listen to adaptations or performances of them. You can also consult various sources of criticism or commentary on them. You can also write your own essays on them or inspired by them.


FAQs




  • What are Shakespeare's essays?



Shakespeare's essays are short pieces of writing in verse that express his personal opinion or argument on a specific topic or issue.


  • How many essays did Shakespeare write?



Shakespeare wrote four major essays that are usually included in his complete works: The Phoenix and the Turtle, A Lover's Complaint, The Rape of Lucrece and The Passionate Pilgrim.


  • What are the main themes and topics of Shakespeare's essays?



Shakespeare's essays explore some of the most universal and timeless questions that human beings face: What is love? What is death? What is justice? What is honour? What is virtue? What is beauty? What is truth? How do we cope with suffering? How do we deal with guilt? How do we find meaning in life?


  • What are the main features and techniques of Shakespeare's essays?



Shakespeare's essays are written in verse, using rhyme, rhythm, meter and figurative language. They are rich in imagery, symbolism, allegory and allusion. They are influenced by classical mythology, history, philosophy and literature. They are also connected to his plays and poems, sharing some of their characters, plots, settings and motifs.


  • Why are Shakespeare's essays important and relevant for modern readers?



Shakespeare's essays are important and relevant for modern readers because they challenge us to think about the power and beauty of love; the mystery and mystery of death; the possibility and impossibility of transcendence; the value and purpose of art; the role and responsibility of society; and the identity and destiny of ourselves.


71b2f0854b


About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...

Members

bottom of page