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Rustam Rams
Rustam Rams

The Last Shift (2020) [WORK] Full Movie



Despite some unexpected character choices and other small stumbles, this indie drama gets by on great performances, bittersweet humor, and many snapshots of heartbreaking truths. While The Last Shift vividly and realistically captures small-town life and its economic and social struggles, Stanley's character raises some questions. His 38 years seem to have happened in a void; other than his memories of high school, there's nothing in the movie about his actual life outside the restaurant. Nevertheless, Jenkins offers a deeply rich performance, full of wheezes and pains, giving Stanley an inner life that fills in some of the blanks. McGhie is excellent, too, holding his own with the veteran character actor.




The Last Shift (2020) Full Movie


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In dealing with issues of race and racism, The Last Shift doesn't go very deep or very far, but it still covers its themes thoughtfully. Stanley clearly respects his boss, Shazz (a terrific Da'Vine Joy Randolph), and he likes Jevon, but he doesn't at all understand White privilege or systemic racism. A scene in which he deals with police after a traffic incident clearly underlines this, and nothing in the movie clearly indicates that Stanley ever changes his problematic way of thinking. Writer-director Andrew Cohn lays out most of the discord through the movie's dialogue, but it never feels preachy or overwritten. A last encounter between Stanley and Jevon on a bus near the end feels somehow unsatisfying but is perhaps realistic -- and then a final upbeat coda for Jevon feels satisfying and yet somehow false.


But it's Stan's last night, literally his last shift, and he's handing over his greasy kingdom to Jevon (Shane Paul McGhie), a bright, self-destructive young Black man on probation for a litany of petty charges that include defacing a monument, going the wrong way on an escalator and, naturally, resisting arrest. It's not hard to imagine that another suspect might have been let off with a warning, but Jevon has an attitude and he's political.


In a different, easier movie, Jevon and Stan would become buddies by the end of the shift, with Stan agreeing with Jevon and the audience that Oscar's should only be a stop along the way for Jevon -- who along with being a promising rhetorician and a pain in the butt has been an irresponsible father.


"Do you honestly think that this whole free-loading universe is out to get you? You're stuck in here, same as me." Sony Pictures has released an official trailer for an indie dramedy titled The Last Shift, which originally premiered at the Sundance Film Festival earlier this year. The film is directed by Emmy-winning doc filmmaker Andrew Cohn, making his first narrative feature, and is an American story about two men struggling in the same town, while worlds apart. Richard Jenkins co-stars as a fast food worker who plans to call it quits after 38 years on the graveyard shift at Oscar's Chicken and Fish. His last weekend takes a turn while training his replacement, Jevon, played by Shane Paul McGhie (also seen in American Skin, Foster Boy, and on "Deputy"). The cast includes Ed O'Neill, Allison Tolman, Da'Vine Joy Randolph, and Birgundi Baker. This looks like a humble, honest story of two people just trying to live and enjoy life.


After 38 years flipping burgers, the stalwart night-shift cook in a Michigan fast-food joint gets ready to retire by training up his successor in this US indie drama that casts an eye on a troubled nation. Racial and generational divides stand between Richard Jenkins's hangdog old geezer and young offender Shane Paul McGhie, who's on probation after defacing a statue and is far from thrilled to be on chicken-sandwich duty. Everything looks set for a standard serio-comic tale of friendship against the odds, with McGhie holding his own against the sheer class of his experienced foil. Yet writer/director Andrew Cohn (who's previously worked in documentaries) doesn't settle for the easy option. True, the plot shift that moves the story in an unexpected direction is rather clumsily handled, but the movie gains more depth in the process. The highly persuasive performances leave us with much to ponder, not least the suggestion that, for these two, as for America as a whole, mutual understanding will be a challenging process.


After working at Oscar's Chicken and Fish for 38 years, the aging fast-food worker Stanley is finally retiring. But his last shift takes an unexpected turn as he trains his young...Read more replacement, Jevon.


When I first started thinking about where we are today versus where we were a year ago and the impact COVID had on our progress, I initially focused on our 2020 AFFO per share of $2.95 which is ironically the same pro forma number we guided to for 2019 at our Investor Day. So for a moment I thought, wow, we just lost the year of progress. But when I walked through the rest of our goals and objectives, I realized that we didn't actually lose a year. Yes, our earnings took a hit, which I believe is just transient. But we achieved every other goal and benchmark that we set out to do and more. Today at Spirit we have a proven portfolio with strong tenants and tested underwriting, a fully integrated asset management and acquisitions platform that is producing results, deeper relationships with our tenant base, enhanced tools to support our underwriting, forecasting and monitoring, a pristine balance sheet and the opportunity to substantially accelerate earnings growth over and above our expectations depending upon the shape of the movie theater industry's recovery.


Other income was very small this quarter contributing only $68,000 to earnings. As I mentioned last quarter, our two remaining mortgage loan receivables totaling $29 million were repaid in full, greatly simplifying our income streams. Going forward, other income will primarily be generated by our one remaining direct financing lease, interest income on invested cash and any lease termination fees.


One last thing I'll add, you talked about the years to come, and I think that ultimately [Indecipherable] former career before I came to Spirit, I was on the banking side. So it was all about trying to solve clients -- really trying to work with clients' objectives and try to help them. What we do here at Spirit and as we kind of continue to align our organization with our tenants our tenants are our partners, right. We want to really help them grow. That conversation is happening now. We are doing repeat business with existing tenants. It's a very powerful advantage for us, not just from a predictability standpoint as you kind of map out the future in terms of our acquisition pipeline, but how we can shift the allocation of the portfolio and then does it as well as anyone. And so we are trying to aspire to do it that way. And I believe we have the right people in place, processes in place. We're still not there yet. I think we're really gaining a lot of momentum. That's when we really pulled that piece of the puzzle together. You're going to see some tremendous earnings acquisition power of the platform.


So, yeah, I wouldn't say there is any new shift in what we do, but industrial has been, we talked about it for a while, which continued to increase our investment activity. And that's going to be an important part of what we do. I think the piece of the puzzle that's a little bit different and nuance for us is the type of industrial properties that we're buying, they tend to be long dated direct sale leasebacks with fixed escalations. We're not buying multi-tenant industrial, we're not buying industrial value add. That's not really the -- that's not in our wheelhouse. Where we think we can add value is really understanding kind of the credit profile and upside of a particular tenant and hopefully giving in at a very good basis with long-term -- with a long-term lease. And we've already seen that in some of our industrial acquisitions where you've seen real credit upgrades and that's such a big positive for us. So I'd say that our industrial is very narrow defined lane right now. We're not competing, I would say with the broader based -- some of the broader based value-add and core industrial buyers right now.


The industries are -- if you look at our heat map, we're pretty disciplined. It's all pretty transparent there. So, look, we look forward to doing more car washes. I think you'll see us doing -- continue doing industrial, light manufacturing, you'll see us hopefully do more casual dining. QSRs are challenging because of the pricing, but we think there's going to be some interesting casual dining opportunities. We love health and fitness. We love the sporting goods area. We love warehouse. Our warehouse clubs, At Home, we love those guys, right. We've continued to do more At Homes. It's such a good story. And so a lot of the things that we had acquired have been real beneficiaries of COVID. And as we come out of COVID we will shift some of that allocation into more, what I'll call, real estate that relies on high touch aggregation of people right now. So you'll see us to make that shift as the year goes on.


It's certainly something that when we talk of those types of tenants is on their menu as they look at their most efficient way to financial business. I guess the way I would describe it is, we can fit in -- we can be very complementary to the high yield market, especially as some of these companies look at acquisitions, particularly in that business where they are looking at sale leasebacks, high yield, leveraged loans. That's not the main part of what we do, but for sure like -- look, lower leverage lending spreads do affect our cap rates, that's for sure. But then I think there's still -- like I said, our sweet spot is $500 million in revenue, $500 million to $1 billion in terms of the company's revenues. So while spreads have tightened, they haven't really compressed dramatically in this area. But I would say that -- we -- it's not as aggressive as it was cap rate wise for what we're looking at as I would say last year at this time. But we watch it carefully and we think it can be complementary at times for us as well. 041b061a72


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