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Working Mothers

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Landon Rogers
Landon Rogers

The System (2023) 2021



Through this solicitation, OJJDP seeks to support states' and counties' efforts to developstatewide or countywide juvenile justice policies to reduce reoffending, improveoutcomes for youth, and meaningfully reduce racial and ethnic disparities and to ensurethat juvenile justice systems are aligned with developmentally appropriate, trauma informed, evidence-based practices. Reforms can address multiple aspects of the system's interaction with youth, including but not limited to arrest, diversion, adjudication and disposition, community supervision, and aftercare. Applicants are also encouraged to consider non-criminal-justice centered interventions (e.g., interventions related to providing stable housing or educational opportunities) that can reduce the likelihood of reoffending and increase the likelihood of positive youth outcomes.




The System (2023)


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The Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship at the Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, invites faculty and staff who are committed to enhancing systems change education to partner with us to bring Map the System to their students. We have had over 10 partner institutions across GNAM participate to date, and would love to extend this to as many of our partner members as possible. We were also delighted that the University of Cape Town, one of the GNAM partner schools, were our Map the System 2022 Global winners!Register your institution now via our website before 30 October 2022 and join a global network of social impact educators committed to providing students with transformational learning opportunities.


GNAM Network institutions are eligible for a substantial fee discount of 2,000 to participate in Map the System. For questions regarding the institution participation fee, please contact us at mapthesystem@sbs.ox.ac.uk


This season was one for the books, with a variety of weather patterns packed into a short 16 days: warm weather, rain and a winter storm. It has not made it the easiest season for spearers to navigate. On opening weekend, only about 3,000 ice shanties were counted. This is half of what was counted in 2022. But for those that found safe ice, the fish were there and seemed to be plentiful. For the season, 1,405 fish were harvested on the entire Winnebago system (155 juvenile females, 599 adult females and 651 males). For comparison, 1,519 fish were harvested in 2022 when ice conditions were ideal.


Despite the impending winter storm, a few anglers made it out on the ice Wednesday. Only 7 fish were harvested, with 0 juvenile females, 3 adult females and 4 males. This was the lowest harvest day this season, bringing the total to 1,020 Lake Sturgeon harvested for Lake Winnebago and 1,305 for the entire Winnebago system so far this season. The largest fish harvested today was an 81.1-pound male which was 64.5 inches long. It was speared by Jackson Goldapske and registered at the Southwest Winnebago station.


From these movement data, we can answer questions about seasonal migrations, river residency and spawning habits. This array expanded from 22 receivers in just the Wolf River in 2004 to more than 60 as of 2022 throughout the entire Winnebago system, including Lake Winnebago and the upper and parts of the lower Fox River.


Tuesday was another nice day on the ice with sunshine and cold weather. On Lake Winnebago, 21 fish were harvested with three juvenile females, nine adult females and nine males. This makes 1,298 lake sturgeon harvested for the entire Winnebago system so far this season. The Pipe registration station continues to have the highest daily harvest, with 11 fish and 354 fish for the season. One of the nine fish was the 90.7 lbs., 77.9-inch F1 female speared by Russel Gulig.


With warmer temperatures continuing to prevail today, only 72 fish were harvested throughout the system, with 58 from Lake Winnebago (5 juvenile females, 27 adult females, 26 males) and 14 from the Upriver lakes (0 juvenile females, 3 adult females, 11 males).


Despite the slow day, a record-setting fish was caught! James Gishkowsky speared a massive 177.3-pound, 79.9-inch female sturgeon from Lake Winnebago. This is the 7th largest fish ever speared from the Winnebago system! This female was an F4 or black egg fish.


With the warm temperatures, today was again a slow day for spearing on the Winnebago system. In total, 127 fish were harvested throughout the system, with 100 from Lake Winnebago (7 juvenile females, 53 adult females, 40 males) and 27 from the Upriver lakes (1 juvenile female, 9 adult females, 17 males). This weekend, many spearers were seen pulling their shacks on both Lake Winnebago and the Upriver lakes before the forecasted warm weather and rain set for tomorrow.


Continued warm weather today likely caused spearers to leave the ice early. Because of this, only 261 fish were harvested throughout the system (42 juvenile females, 93 adult females and 126 males). This is about half the fish that were registered yesterday.


The Winnebago system is home to one of North America's largest lake sturgeon populations and hosts a unique winter spear fishery. Further, the system is one of only two locations where lake sturgeon can be harvested with a spear (Black Lake, Michigan is the other). The first modern sturgeon fishery took place in 1932. Although regulations have changed through time, the premise of using a spear to harvest a sturgeon through the ice has remained constant.


There is no residency requirement for participating in the sturgeon spearing season, but license holders are predominantly Wisconsin residents residing within 60 miles of the Winnebago system. Over the years, the season has grown into a unique cultural event rich in tradition. Most spearers fish in groups comprised of family and friends. Each spearing group has its traditions that they celebrate with each passing year. For many, the season is defined by the time spent with loved ones, not the harvesting of a fish. Harvesting a fish is a bonus for spearers with good fortune, and each fish comes with a unique story that will be shared countless times over the hours and years that follow. The social and traditional aspects of the sport keep most people coming back year after year.


The minimum spearing age is 12 years old. Youth who turn 12 years of age between Nov. 1 and the last day of the spearing season can purchase a spearing license after the deadline. Military personnel home on leave can also buy a license after Oct. 31. Licenses for both fisheries are $20 for Wisconsin residents and $65 for nonresidents and can be purchased through the GoWild system or at any license sales location.


Whatever is placed in the water must be removed or retrieved when requested. In most cases, items are attached to a string or can be "hooked" for removal. Decoy types are unlimited if they don't involve any artificial lights (glow sticks are illegal) or hooks. Minnows can be used provided they are in a sealed container. Regulations related to minnow use and transportation (VHS rules) on the Winnebago system apply.


The backbone of a home security system is the base station. This unit communicates with all the security sensors and smart-home components in your house. Many connect to a home router, but if your base station comes with Wi-Fi or cellular support, placement is more flexible. Contact sensors are the first thing you should buy alongside the base station; these attach to doors and windows and alert you when they open. Other home security components include motion sensors, keypads, key fobs, cameras, glass-break sensors, and panic buttons.


Wirecutter takes security and privacy issues seriously and, as much as possible, investigates how the companies whose products we recommend deal with customer data. As part of our vetting process for home security systems, we looked at the security and data-privacy practices behind our picks.


All of these devices come with a privacy policy that, as you have probably experienced, can be difficult for the layperson to parse. We read each of the privacy policies for the systems we chose to test, specifically looking for sections that stray from what we consider to be standard in the category. We also reached out to the companies that produce our top picks and had them answer an extensive questionnaire to confirm information that we thought should be of primary concern for any potential buyer (see Privacy and security: How our picks compare to read their answers in full).


If you opt to use security cameras, only consider models made by companies that provide robust security and privacy protections. Our top and runner-up picks include two-factor authentication, which does a good job of ensuring that access to your camera and video recordings is restricted. The Abode Smart Security Kit is the only one of our picks that currently makes it an option (the Ring and SimpliSafe systems require it).


The system performed well in our tests, both in self-monitoring mode and when connected to the monitoring service. Users can customize entry and exit delays up to four minutes. The system sends an instant push confirmation when in Away mode or when the alarm is triggered. When we tested the professional monitoring, we got service calls between 70 and 120 seconds after the alarm was triggered. The service rep was always polite and asked for a four-digit PIN to keep police from being dispatched. We were able to arm and disarm the Abode system using Alexa, Google Assistant, and Apple HomeKit. For Alexa and Google Assistant, you need to speak a PIN, whereas HomeKit requires you to unlock your iPhone.


The heart of the Arlo Security System is a Wi-Fi hub with an integrated, backlit keypad, a siren, a motion detector, and the ability to alert you when smoke and CO alarms are triggered. The $199 kit comes with the hub and two external all-in-one sensors, which connect back to the hub via wireless Arlo SecureLink technology, and can be placed throughout the house. (A starter kit with the hub and five sensors is $299.) The system can be self-monitored without a monthly fee, or with a live monitoring plan that costs $25 per month as of February 2023. 041b061a72


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